example:

session is default
2266 is custom port

putty -load default -ssh account@123.123.123.123 -P 2266

取自網站:http://the.earth.li/~sgtatham/putty/0.53b/htmldoc/Chapter3.html#3.7.3

3.7 The PuTTY command line

PuTTY can be made to do various things without user intervention by supplying command-line arguments (e.g., from a command prompt window, or a Windows shortcut).

3.7.1 Starting a session from the command line

These options allow you to bypass the configuration window and launch straight into a session.

To start a connection to a server called host:

putty.exe [-ssh | -telnet | -rlogin | -raw] [user@]host

If this syntax is used, settings are taken from the Default Settings (see section 4.1.2); user overrides these settings if supplied. Also, you can specify a protocol, which will override the default protocol (see section 3.7.3.2).

For telnet sessions, the following alternative syntax is supported (this makes PuTTY suitable for use as a URL handler for telnet URLs in web browsers):

putty.exe telnet://host[:port]/

In order to start an existing saved session called sessionname, use the -load option (described in section 3.7.3.1).

putty.exe -load "session name"

3.7.2 -cleanup

If invoked with the -cleanup option, rather than running as normal, PuTTY will remove its registry entries and random seed file from the local machine (after confirming with the user).

3.7.3 Standard command-line options

PuTTY and its associated tools support a range of command-line options, most of which are consistent across all the tools. This section lists the available options in all tools. Options which are specific to a particular tool are covered in the chapter about that tool.

3.7.3.1 -load: load a saved session

The -load option causes PuTTY to load configuration details out of a saved session. If these details include a host name, then this option is all you need to make PuTTY start a session (although Plink still requires an explicitly specified host name).

You need double quotes around the session name if it contains spaces.

If you want to create a Windows shortcut to start a PuTTY saved session, this is the option you should use: your shortcut should call something like

d:\path\to\putty.exe -load "my session"

(Note that PuTTY itself supports an alternative form of this option, for backwards compatibility. If you execute putty @sessionname it will have the same effect as putty -load "sessionname". With the @ form, no double quotes are required, and the @ sign must be the very first thing on the command line. This form of the option is deprecated.)

3.7.3.2 Selecting a protocol: -ssh, -telnet, -rlogin, -raw

To choose which protocol you want to connect with, you can use one of these options:

  • -ssh selects the SSH protocol.
  • -telnet selects the Telnet protocol.
  • -rlogin selects the Rlogin protocol.
  • -raw selects the raw protocol.

These options are not available in the file transfer tools PSCP and PSFTP (which only work with the SSH protocol).

These options are equivalent to the protocol selection buttons in the Session panel of the PuTTY configuration box (see section 4.1.1).

3.7.3.3 -v: increase verbosity

Most of the PuTTY tools can be made to tell you more about what they are doing by supplying the -v option. If you are having trouble when making a connection, or you're simply curious, you can turn this switch on and hope to find out more about what is happening.

3.7.3.4 -l: specify a login name

You can specify the user name to log in as on the remote server using the -l option. For example, plink login.example.com -l fred.

These options are equivalent to the username selection box in the Connection panel of the PuTTY configuration box (see section 4.13.2).

3.7.3.5 -L and -R: set up port forwardings

As well as setting up port forwardings in the PuTTY configuration (see section 4.19.2), you can also set up forwardings on the command line. The command-line options work just like the ones in Unix ssh programs.

To forward a local port (say 5110) to a remote destination (say popserver.example.com port 110), you can write something like one of these:

putty -L 5110:popserver.example.com:110 -load mysession
plink mysession -L 5110:popserver.example.com:110

And to forward a remote port to a local destination, just use the -R option instead of -L:

putty -R 5023:mytelnetserver.myhouse.org:23 -load mysession
plink mysession -R 5023:mytelnetserver.myhouse.org:23

For general information on port forwarding, see section 3.5.

These options are not available in the file transfer tools PSCP and PSFTP.

3.7.3.6 -m: read a remote command or script from a file

The -m option performs a similar function to the "Remote command" box in the SSH panel of the PuTTY configuration box (see section 4.17.1). However, the -m option expects to be given a file name, and it will read a command from that file. On most Unix systems, you can even put multiple lines in this file and execute more than one command in sequence, or a whole shell script.

This option is not available in the file transfer tools PSCP and PSFTP.

3.7.3.7 -P: specify a port number

The -P option is used to specify the port number to connect to. If you have a Telnet server running on port 9696 of a machine instead of port 23, for example:

putty -telnet -P 9696 host.name
plink -telnet -P 9696 host.name

(Note that this option is more useful in Plink than in PuTTY, because in PuTTY you can write putty -telnet host.name 9696 in any case.)

These options are equivalent to the protocol selection buttons in the Session panel of the PuTTY configuration box (see section 4.1.1).

3.7.3.8 -pw: specify a password

A simple way to automate a remote login is to supply your password on the command line. This is not recommended for reasons of security. If you possibly can, we recommend you set up public-key authentication instead. See chapter 8 for details.

Note that the -pw option only works when you are using the SSH protocol. Due to fundamental limitations of Telnet and Rlogin, these protocols do not support automated password authentication.

3.7.3.9 -A and -a: control agent forwarding

The -A option turns on SSH agent forwarding, and -a turns it off. These options are only meaningful if you are using SSH.

See chapter 9 for general information on Pageant, and section 9.4 for information on agent forwarding. Note that there is a security risk involved with enabling this option; see section 9.5 for details.

These options are equivalent to the agent forwarding checkbox in the Auth panel of the PuTTY configuration box (see section 4.18.3).

These options are not available in the file transfer tools PSCP and PSFTP.

3.7.3.10 -X and -x: control X11 forwarding

The -X option turns on X11 forwarding in SSH, and -x turns it off. These options are only meaningful if you are using SSH.

For information on X11 forwarding, see section 3.4.

These options are equivalent to the X11 forwarding checkbox in the Tunnels panel of the PuTTY configuration box (see section 4.19.1).

These options are not available in the file transfer tools PSCP and PSFTP.

3.7.3.11 -t and -T: control pseudo-terminal allocation

The -t option ensures PuTTY attempts to allocate a pseudo-terminal at the server, and -T stops it from allocating one. These options are only meaningful if you are using SSH.

These options are equivalent to the "Don't allocate a pseudo-terminal" checkbox in the SSH panel of the PuTTY configuration box (see section 4.17.2).

These options are not available in the file transfer tools PSCP and PSFTP.

3.7.3.12 -C: enable compression

The -C option enables compression of the data sent across the network. This option is only meaningful if you are using SSH.

This option is equivalent to the "Enable compression" checkbox in the SSH panel of the PuTTY configuration box (see section 4.17.3).

3.7.3.13 -1 and -2: specify an SSH protocol version

The -1 and -2 options force PuTTY to use version 1 or version 2 of the SSH protocol. These options are only meaningful if you are using SSH.

These options are equivalent to selecting your preferred SSH protocol version as "1 only" or "2 only" in the SSH panel of the PuTTY configuration box (see section 4.17.4).

3.7.3.14 -i: specify an SSH private key

The -i option allows you to specify the name of a private key file which PuTTY will use to authenticate with the server. This option is only meaningful if you are using SSH.

For general information on public-key authentication, see chapter 8.

This option is equivalent to the "Private key file for authentication" box in the Auth panel of the PuTTY configuration box (see section 4.18.5).






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